Orgasm Inc: The Story of OneTaste: Netflix doco takes a look at the cult ‘slow-sex’ movement

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Orgasm Inc: The OneTaste Story

There are many documentaries and series on Netflix about apparent cults and dodgy group leaders. But Orgasm Inc is still a surprisingly deep dive into a story that, to my amazement, isn’t better known.

OneTaste founders Nicole Daedone and Robert Kendall are now being investigated for sex trafficking and labor violations – among other things.

OneTaste promoted a “slow-sex” movement, much the same as the slow-food movement, as a way to get satisfaction and nourishment by consciously focusing on love and taking your time. It all sounds good.

But by bundling their ideas into courses, conferences, and memberships, OneTaste began to look more like a pyramid scheme than a legitimate social service. And when your employees start telling stories of being coerced into having sex with potential customers and customers to make sales, then we’re in really cult territory.

This 90-minute standalone film is a captivating and engaging look at the toxicity of it all. And that “R18” rating is the real deal. Don’t leave clamps unattended with Orgasm Inc!

Nicole Daedone was one of the founders of the controversial sexual wellness company OneTaste.

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Nicole Daedone was one of the founders of the controversial sexual wellness company OneTaste.

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A Knight’s Tale is now available to stream on Netflix.

The story of a knight

More often than not, when I scroll through the list of new Netflix additions, I wonder why they bothered.

There are movies there that would once have filled a DVD store‘s sales bin, but are apparently now as hot as hell with the good folks of Aotearoa.

But, every once in a while, Netflix reveals a real gem that I almost forgot about. And the recent A Knight’s Tale – is one of them.

The film was released in 2001 and was an instant hit with audiences – and any critic with a sense of humor.

Heath Ledger – never more charming – plays a peasant who poses as a knight, takes part in jousts, befriends the writer Geoffrey Chaucer and generally has a brilliant medieval period.

The film doesn’t take itself seriously for a minute, but neither is it a parody of the Robin Hood: Men In Tights genre. A Knight’s Tale mixes a soundtrack of classic hits – Queen’s We Will Rock You never sounded better – with flashy narration and sharp editing. Ledger is heartbreakingly good, while Paul Bettany (Marvel’s Avengers movies) delivers the performance that got Hollywood noticed.

If all you want to do tonight is watch something funny, exciting, and deeply likable, A Knight’s Tale is a vintage gem.

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The American is now available to stream on Netflix.

The American

Photographer and director Anton Corbijn is a cautious designer of beautiful images and elliptical and impenetrable lines. His feature debut, made in 2007, was a surprisingly good black-and-white biopic of Joy Division lead singer Ian Curtis. So, no, no one really expected Corbijn’s next film to be a thriller about an assassin on the run in Italy, starring George Clooney.

I remember seeing The American in theaters, mostly because of the large number of people getting up and walking out. The marketing said “Clooney” and “gunman” — but the movie is a quiet, obtuse, and sometimes frustratingly pointless ride through Clooney’s insecurities and the occasional real danger. Calling it a thriller is a huge stretch. Personally, I loved it. But I also walked in with no expectations and nothing to do except be slightly surprised that The American had a mainstream release.

If you’re a fan of Jim Jarmusch and Nic Roeg, you might appreciate what Corbijn is trying to do here. Otherwise, don’t bother.

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